Bureaucratic Bungle

Monsanto Still Gaming the System




Yongyut Kumsr/Shutterstock.com

Monsanto, the company that makes the controversial weed killer Roundup, is setting farmer against farmer and state against state with its newest product, dicamba. Amid claims and counterclaims over effectiveness and safety of crops and humans, the debate is shedding new light on how new agricultural products are introduced, tested and regulated. One major difference with dicamba is the gaseous vaporization it uses to treat crops, causing the poison to spread onto neighboring plants via wind. Brad Williams, a Missouri farmer, says that leaves on trees were “so deformed you couldn’t even really identify the differences between them.”

The manufacturer claims that proper usage protocols are not being followed. Some farmers agree, while others report crop damage and human health issues. One pivotal point of debate is which federal and state agencies have jurisdiction and the power to set enforceable guidelines. At stake are millions of acres that have already been sprayed, along with the future of non-GMO farms inadvertently contaminated by the dicamba sprayed on genetically modified crops that need the poison to survive.


This article appears in the February 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Renewable Payoff

For a few hours last May, Germany’s renewable mix of energy generated so much power that customers were actually paid for using electricity.

Sealife Sanctuary

Greenpeace is working with the European Union and Germany to set aside an Antarctic sanctuary of almost three-quarters of a million square miles to protect whales, penguins and other wildlife.

Add your comment:
Edit ModuleShow Tags

See More »This Month

October 2014 Publisher Letter

It’s been four years since we began publishing Natural Awakenings Chicago, in October 2010.

Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) was formally recognized by clinicians in the 1980s as a form of depression most commonly noticed in the winter. Research shows SAD to affect 4 to 6 percent of the general population with up to 75 percent of these individuals noted to be women.

Learn about Alzheimer’s and Diet

Dr. Martha Clare Morris, ScD, a Rush University Medical Center nutritional epidemiologist, will present a free dementia education seminar, The MIND Diet to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease, from 5:30 to 7 p.m., February 24, at Temple B’nai Jehoshua Beth Elohim, in Deerfield.

Celebrating Latina Culture

The Windy City will celebrate its diverse and broad cultural appeal from June 1 through 3 at Gourmet Mexico and the Chicago Latina Expo.

December 2012 Publisher Letter

December is one of my favorite months to publish Natural Awakenings, as we tie up the loose ends of this past year, and look forward with optimistic eyes to the promise of the new year.

Good Food Festival and Conference at UIC

The ninth Good Food Festival & Conference will celebrate local farmers and food producers, March 14 to 16, at the 2013 UIC Forum, in Chicago.