Munch Nuts for a Healthy Brain

Improves Cognitive Functions




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Seniors that ate more than 10 grams—about two teaspoons—of nuts a day were able to ward off normal cognitive decline and even improve their cognitive functions by up to 60 percent, according to University of South Australia researchers. The study was based on 22 years of records of 4,822 Chinese adults ages 55 and older; 17 percent of them ate nuts every day, most often peanuts. These seniors had as much as 60 percent improved cognitive function compared to those that didn’t eat nuts, and they showed better thinking, reasoning and memory. “Nuts are known to be high in healthy fats, protein and fiber with nutritional properties that can lower cholesterol and improve cognitive health,” says study author Ming Li.


This article appears in the July 2019 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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