Vegetables and Orange Juice Protect Memory

Certain Fruits and Veggies Reduce Memory Loss




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A Harvard study was conducted on the diets of nearly 28,000 male health professionals spanning two decades between their 50s and 70s and published by the American Academy of Neurology. It found those that drank orange juice and ate leafy greens, berries and dark orange and red vegetables suffered significantly less memory loss than others. Subjects reported every four years and were examined for both thinking and memory skills. Those that ate about six servings of vegetables a day were a third less likely to develop poor thinking skills than those consuming two servings; those that drank orange juice every day were half as likely to develop poor thinking skills as those drinking one serving per month. Men that ate larger amounts of fruits and vegetables 20 years earlier were less likely to develop similar problems, whether or not they kept eating larger amounts of fruits and vegetables later.


This article appears in the March 2019 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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