Recipes from a Farm Kitchen




Photo credit Jen Miller, Prairie Wind Family Farm

"We’re on a granita-kick this summer! We love the refreshing and light flavor, and it’s a great way to use up very ripe fruit. This recipe is flexible enough to work for melon and other stone fruits, too!” says Jen Miller, of Prairie Wind Family Farm, in Grayslake.

 

Peach and Lime Granita

Yields: 4 to 6 servings

3 med peaches, peeled and sliced

2 Tbsp sugar, or less/more to taste

Zest and juice of one lime

Water as needed

Sugar the peaches and let stand for 20 minutes or so.

Stir in the lime juice and zest

Use a handheld blender to crush the peaches, adding enough water to get things going, if necessary.

Transfer the blended peach mixture to a shallow pan and place in the freezer.

Every couple hours use the tines of a fork to break up the granita into crystals.

To serve, remove the granita from the freezer and let stand for a few minutes to loosen.

Scoop into bowls or glasses and garnish with a lime slice and a drizzle of honey if desired.

 

Wheat Berry Salad with Green Beans and Sweet Corn

Yields: 4 to 6 servings

“We love quick, nutritious, refreshing summer salads that allow us to recharge our bodies after hot day in the farm fields. We often add roasted walnuts to this salad for more protein,” says Jen Miller.

2¼ cups wheat berries

Kosher salt

½ cup plus 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, more as needed

⅓  cup sherry vinegar

2 Tbsp roasted walnut oil

Freshly ground black pepper

1½ cup cut green beans (1-inch pieces), blanched for 1-2 minutes until crisp-tender

1½ cup fresh corn kernels, blanched for 1-2 minutes

1 cup crumbled blue cheese

¼ cup thinly sliced red onion

Fill a large bowl with cold water, add the wheat berries, and let soak for 10 to 18 hours and drain.

Bring 7 cups of water to a boil in a 4-quart pot over high heat. Add ¾ teaspoon salt. Add the wheat berries, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook uncovered, stirring occasionally and adding more boiling water as necessary to keep the wheat berries covered until tender, about 1 to 1½ hours.

Drain and rinse the wheat berries with cold water to stop the cooking. Let cool.

Put the vinegar in a small bowl and gradually whisk in ½ cup of olive oil.

Whisk in the walnut oil.

Taste and season with salt, pepper and additional vinegar or olive oil as needed.

Put the cooked and cooled wheat berries in a large serving bowl and toss to break up any clumps. Add the green beans, corn, blue cheese, onion, and ½ cup vinaigrette and toss.

Taste and season as needed with more vinaigrette, salt and pepper, and serve.

 

Note: The salad can be refrigerated for up to 1 day. If making ahead, let sit at room temperature so it’s not refrigerator-cold and season with more vinaigrette, salt and pepper before serving.

 

Recipes courtesy of Jen Miller, of Prairie Wind Family Farm, which grows a wide variety of certified organic vegetables, pasture-raised hens for eggs and provides fresh fruit to CSA members, delivered year-round to north and western suburban locations. Fall vegetable and egg shares start in October. For more information and to sign up for the CSA season, visit PrairieWindFamilyFarm.com.

 

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Bring on the Mushrooms

Mushrooms are fungi that can grow above and below the ground. They are hearty and comforting, perfect for the winter season—great in soups and stews or by themselves.

Healthy Whipped (Coconut) Cream

If your taste buds love it, but your body disagrees, functional medicine physician Barbie Allegretti, DC, has a dairy-free alternative that is easy to whip up and adds a great touch to any wintertime treat.

A Taste of the Holiday Spirit

Surrounded by the glacial hills of the Kettle Moraine, Elkhart Lake celebrates the holiday season with enticing cuisine and an annual Old World Christmas Market at The Osthoff Resort.

Give Radicchio a Try

It has been praised for its medicinal properties, like vitamin K, which is great for healthy bones and nervous system.

Recipes from a Farm Kitchen

The sweet, fall carrots and beets make a great salad to celebrate the rich soil where they were grown, and the spinach frittata reminds me to prepare more recipes for winter spinach harvests to come.

Add your comment:
Edit ModuleShow Tags

See More »This Month

TheosoFest Mind, Body and Spirit Festival

Attracting more than 3,000 people annually, the festival takes place on the Society’s 40 acres of landscaped grounds, featuring a world-class library, the Quest Book Shop, an outdoor labyrinth and the Buddha Meditation Garden.

Blending Business and Spirituality

Fetzer started a long preoccupation with radio in 1922 and built an empire to become one of the 400 richest Americans by participating in new communication technology, including radio, television and even cable.

It’s Time To Dance This Fall

The CBG Institute for Dance and Health presents a new class, Jazz Mondays, with Kate Wagner.

Workshop: The Transformative Power of Edgar Cayce Readings

Edgar Cayce believed that the growth of personal consciousness was the ultimate purpose of our existence on Earth.

New Organic Roots Eco Botanicals

The full line includes a variety of shampoos and conditioners, a leave-in conditioner, volumizing spray, alcohol-free hair spray, deep conditioner, shine oil and reconstructing oil.

Streets Alive and Green Living Festival on Main Street in Evanston

The annual Evanston Streets Alive Festival will transform Main Street into a mile-long public park from 1 to 5 p.m., September 9, featuring fun family activities.