Fiber Lowers Blood Sugar

Improves Glucose Levels




irin-k/Shutterstock.com

In a study that offers hope for people with Type 2 diabetes, Rutgers University researchers have shown that a diet high in diverse fibers promotes the growth of certain gut bacteria, leading to improved blood glucose control, increased insulin production and improved average blood glucose (A1C) levels. In the six-year study published in Science, 27 diabetes patients in China were fed a diet of whole grains, Traditional Chinese Medicinal foods and prebiotics for up to 86 days, while a group of 16 similar patients ate a similar diet with less fiber. All took the diabetes drug acarbose, which helps turn starch into fiber.

By the study’s end, 89 percent of those on the high-fiber diet and 50 percent of the lower-fiber diet group reached blood sugar levels in the normal range. Researchers theorized that the fiber increased numbers of the specific bacteria that break down carbohydrates, producing short-chain fatty acids that nourished gut-lining cells, reduced inflammation and helped control appetite. A shortage of short-chain fatty acids has been associated with Type 2 diabetes and other diseases.


This article appears in the August 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Gardening for Kids

Give kids a patch of dirt and a trowel, and they’ll not only have fun but can find a fresh new appetite for fruit and vegetables.

Toxic Legacy

Women in growing numbers are joining together to deal with the long-term, serious health threats posed by saline and silicone implants.

Plants Talk

Plants may not be raising an audible ruckus, but scientists are finding they communicate silently with each other through smells, hearing and underground networks.

Receive Deep Insights into Buddhism

Presented by the Theosophical Society, renowned Buddhist Monk Ajahn Brahm will present Mindfulness, Bliss and Beyond from 7 to 9:30 p.m., June 19, at the College of DuPage, in Glen Ellyn.

Dancing Prevents Senior Decline

Elderly Japanese women who danced for exercise were 73 percent less likely to be impaired eight years later doing “activities of daily living” such as walking, cooking, dressing and bathing.

Add your comment:
Edit ModuleShow Tags

See More »This Month

Akashic Records Course in Indianapolis

Bill Foss and the Higher Dimensions Network will present the course Journey to the Akashic Records from August 25 to 27 at the Omni Severin Hotel, in Indianapolis.

County Green Conference for a Sustainable Lake County

The third annual County Green sustainability conference will bring local business owners, educators, nonprofits, residents and leaders together to promote a sustainable future in Lake County.

Body & Brain Yoga Tai Chi for Holistic Healing

Body & Brain Yoga Tai Chi, a national group of centers with 13 locations in the Chicago area, is a leader in health, wellness, and integrative lifestyle education.

New Highland Park Location for Dr. David Johnson

David A. Johnson, DC, PT, DPT, and his team at North Shore Spinal & Sports Rehabilitation are hosting a grand opening of their new location

PSYCHOTRONICS

Our minds are very powerful, and we can we direct our intention to make nourishing change, assist sick animals or persons or improve agricultural crop yields. However, most of us are not using our full capabilities to manifest positive effects in the world.

Permaculture in the Midwest: Beautiful, Bountiful Conservation