Only One in 10 U.S. Adults Eats Healthy

Americans Not Consuming Enough Fruits and Vegetables




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Just 9 percent of U.S. adults eat enough vegetables and only 12 percent eat enough fruit every day, concludes a recent study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National guidelines for adults recommend at least one-and-a-half to two cups per day of fruit and two to three cups of vegetables. Consumption is lowest among men, young adults and adults living in poverty.

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