Natural Allergy Control




Early spring can be full of pollens because a large part of the country is in bloom. Ragweed and purple loosestrife will be blooming and filling the air with allergens, and the severity and pervasiveness of strong allergic reactions has increased. When the body experiences allergens, it releases histamines. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology reported that these chemicals can trigger symptoms such as sneezing, excess mucus flow, congestion and swelling of membranes and tissues.

         There are a number of herbs that, when absorbed by the membranes of the nasal passageways, can enter the cells and cause them to produce their own antihistamines rather than spraying steroids up our nose as recommended by Dr. Robert Rountree, in Boulder, Colorado. Yarrow leaf, horseradish root, elder flower and eye bright are a few excellent examples of herbs that can break the histamine cycle naturally. According to the Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine, decoction of these, with calendula and aloe for soothing, works wonderfully for natural congestion relief.

            Another approach is to use a spray consisting of an enhanced aqueous silver colloid. The styptic qualities of silver have been used for years to constrict microcapillaries and reduce bleeding.  The shrinking of the nasal tissues reduces swelling and congestion and at the same time, kills bacteria and fungus. This can help a beleaguered immune system and stop a sinus infection; a welcome prophylactic for the allergy season.

For more information, call herbalist Steven Frank at 888-465-4404 or visit NaturesRiteRemedies.com. See ad on page 17.

 

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