Eat, Learn and Connect at the Good Food Festival




The 13th annual FamilyFarmed Good Food Festival will take place March 18 at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Forum to celebrate local, sustainable, humane and fair food.

                The festival will bring together consumers, producers, top chefs and experts to help put good food on the table. Visitors can shop for local foods at the Good Food Marketplace; observe celebrity chef demonstrations; participate in DIY workshops on the Good Food Commons; introduce kids to good food at the Purple Asparagus Kids’ Corner; get lunch at the Good Food Court; and more.

Natural Awakenings magazine is a media sponsor of the event. Location: 725 W. Roosevelt Rd, Chicago. General admission for Saturday’s Festival is FREE with online registration. Register and get tickets for Masterclass or Urban Farm Bus Tour at goodfoodfestivals.com. Win a free Good Food t-shirt at NAChicago.com/CHI/Good-Food-Festival.

 

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