Enjoying Late-Summer Tomatoes




Photo credit Janie Maxwell

"September may be my favorite month at the farmers’ market. Summer produce is still in abundance and the new crop of fall vegetables is also starting to appear. Remember, just because school has started and fall schedules are in full swing, your farmers’ market is still open and full of wonderful products,” says Janie Maxwell, MS, RDN, LDN, executive director of the Illinois Farmers Market Association (ILFMA).

        She recommends, “The one food I can’t get enough of is fresh tomatoes. I wait all year for tomatoes and enjoy their wonderful, fresh taste. Before the season ends, try this recipe and if possible, make batches and freeze to help extend the season. This isn’t conventional tomato sauce made with San Marzano or Roma tomatoes. It is full of tomato chunks and tastes like fresh tomatoes. It might be good idea to serve it in a bowl, because it is not as thick as traditional tomato sauce. Try serving it with a fresh mozzarella burrata over pasta.”

 

Fresh Tomato Sauce

Yields: 4 servings

2 Tbsp olive oil

2 cloves fresh garlic, minced

4 cups fresh tomatoes, roughly chopped, any variety or size

1 Tbsp fresh oregano, finely chopped

1 Tbsp fresh basil, cut in very thin strips

Salt and pepper to taste

Heat the olive oil in a stainless steel or enamel pot.

Add minced garlic until soft, do not brown.

Add tomatoes and stir.

Cook over low heat until tomato juice starts to form in the bottom of the pot.

Cover and simmer over low heat for about 45 minutes.

Add fresh herbs and season with salt and pepper.

 

ILFMA supports local food and food systems by giving Illinois farmers’ markets and producers access to resources, education and connections in order to grow healthier and economically vibrant communities. For more information, visit ilfma.org.

 

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Recipes from a Farm Kitchen

The sweet, fall carrots and beets make a great salad to celebrate the rich soil where they were grown, and the spinach frittata reminds me to prepare more recipes for winter spinach harvests to come.

Fall Flavors of Squash and Cranberry

Buttercup squash is a variety of winter squash providing a high dose of vitamin A and C, great for protecting the eyes and fighting off germs during flu season.

Recipes from a Farm Kitchen

We’re on a granita-kick this summer! We love the refreshing and light flavor, and it’s a great way to use up very ripe fruit.

Vegan ‘Jello’ Back-to-School Treats

We like to be creative with this recipe. Place pieces of fruit or berries, or edible flowers on the bottom of the molds before adding the liquid ingredients.

Enjoying August’s Harvest

Bleuroot is the site of an exquisite farm to table summer feast being held August 23 to benefit the Illinois Farmers Market Association. All food, wine and spirits served will feature local products in amazing flavor combinations.

Add your comment:
Edit ModuleShow Tags

See More »This Month

Workshop: The Transformative Power of Edgar Cayce Readings

Edgar Cayce believed that the growth of personal consciousness was the ultimate purpose of our existence on Earth.

Check Out the Electric Cars

EVs are fun to drive, less expensive and more convenient to fuel than gasoline vehicles.

TheosoFest Mind, Body and Spirit Festival

Attracting more than 3,000 people annually, the festival takes place on the Society’s 40 acres of landscaped grounds, featuring a world-class library, the Quest Book Shop, an outdoor labyrinth and the Buddha Meditation Garden.

Join People’s Climate March at Chicago Area Locations

Together, we can make governments, institutions and corporations divest from fossil fuel,” says Bill McKibben, a longtime environmental advocate.

Letter from The Publisher

Healthy, flexible, pain-free knees, hips and backs are all part of what keeps us active, moving and functional every day.

Preventing Osteoporosis

Bones are actually living tissue that is constantly changing. Bones develop and strengthen from birth until young adulthood, being the densest in our early 20s.